Minerva

 Minerva

Minerva

Residents of Mexico City, the largest city in North America, are often called chilanga or chilango. Minerva is a chilanga. After graduating from the university, she wandered away from God. In 1989, she recommitted her life to the lordship of Jesus and she thought about spending a year of service at an orphanage. 

August 1989 Minerva arrived at the Baja Mission and was assigned a small trailer, which she remained in until 2017. At last, she had adequate housing. She became a substitute house mother, worked in the kitchen, the nursery, and the laundry room. Lack of sleep did not matter. She said, “It was a blessing to serve.” 

After a few years, they realized she was a university graduate. Many of our interned children had no education. She was given the challenge of bringing them all up to grade level! She was responsible for uniforms and ordering school material and supplies. No child was to be left behind. 

Roberto Hughes was one of those children. He came from a prison where he lived with his incarcerated father. His head was shaved, he was ghastly thin, and he had a broken front tooth. 

 Roberto Hughes

Roberto Hughes

He was given the gift of education, learned to play the piano, and is now an engineer and leads the worship in his church. 

Minerva recalls:

In 1991, our Bible Institute was washed into the sea. The administrator and his assistant resigned. Mario Cordoba asked me to take over the administration with Jon Cowpersmith as the instructor. I said, “No, I know nothing about the Bible Institute or the curriculum, etc.” But I went against my will. 

 These students still faithfully serve the Lord

These students still faithfully serve the Lord

John Huntley of Newport Mesa Christian Center took Charla, Pam Ellis, and me on a three-week tour of Mexican Bible institutes in a big motor home. I learned a lot about Charla’s heart for my people and I could see God working through this reluctant servant. 

After a year in the Bible Institute I became Mario’s assistant. Then on to accounting - a boring job. 

Dr. Luc Chausse, a medical doctor, and his wife Lise, an educator, arrived at the Baja Mission. He said, “These broken children need music.” 

 Music students (left) Lise and Dr. Luc (right)

Music students (left) Lise and Dr. Luc (right)

Recorders and other musical instruments were purchased. Soon Luc and Lise had their band. They played in parades and gave concerts followed by testimonies. Then they flew to Quebec, Canada, to bless many with their musical talents; I was their chaperone. 

 Tito with his wife, Rosario

Tito with his wife, Rosario


Tito Quiroz Sr., a godly man, became the administrator. He had a firm hand and a compassionate heart. He asked if I could take the responsibility for sponsorship. Of course, I said, “no,” because I didn’t know how to communicate with Americans. But he insisted and I found the most wonderful people in the world: our sponsors - people who love God, love children who are not their own in a country not their own, and want to pray and bless them. 

As sponsorship secretary I organize the Christmas party and distribution of the stockings with the help of many others. JoAnn Payne started this tradition and Vicki Gravell took on this large project. 


I thank God for these very generous people. Mario asked me to be office supervisor and I did that job for a few years. But of all those jobs, the sponsorship program is still
my favorite. 

I expected to stay a year, but after 28 years of service I am very blessed. He has taught me, He has healed me, and He has blessed me in wonderful ways. He has been Jehovah Jireh, my provider, and I learned not many years ago, HE LOVES ME. No matter what, He loves me! I pray that all our children will experience God’s love. Amen.